Scale Model Revell Plymouth Cuda Build and Tips.
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Revell Plymouth 'Cuda Buildup

Part 1 | Parts 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5

 

I haven't done a project car for a long time, or a group build off. So this one seemed like a car I could tackle on the limited time I have. Per the loose "rules", I could use any 'Cuda kit representing the years 1970 to 1974. I could also use any kit manufacturer, any scale, and even a resin body. Just about anything goes.

Eventually, around 90 people opted to join in on the build, so I expect there will be a lot of different kinds of Cudas, from funny cars to station wagons.

Now, while I like Mopars, I don't know a whole lot about them when it comes to 'Cuda's, so the choice of a specific kit wasn't too hard. I actually own a Nash Bridges kit, but I don't really like convertibles. Detailing the interior when it's right out there in the open isn't my style or something I get into. So a quick trip to the local hobby store, and I ended up with a kit that is for the most part, identical to the Nash model, but not a convertible. It also included centerline type wheels (and a pair of rear slapper bars if anyone is interested in those for a project).

Revell 71 Plymouth Cuda model kit box

 

 

Now I had the kit. But what direction to go? First, I wanted it to be a daily driver. No drag racer or custom. (I hate body work, so that kind of modification was definitely not going to happen). For the most part, I wanted it to be an easy, low stress project.

I wanted the car to be able to handle. After all, if you drive it around everyday, and it's packing a Hemi, you still want the car to be able to take a curve. Like a street version of a TransAm racing car. Maybe a modern version of Pro Touring.

This would mean, the old torsion bar front end just wasn't going to cut it. There's not much there to work with, and not many ways to make that kind of suspension better. With some Googling, I found a company online that actually makes a new front end (Tubular K-member) for real Cudas, Magnumforce Racing. Pretty hot setup. It's a bit complex to replicate in 1:25 scale, but gave me a good baseline on what to do. With upper and lower control arms, and coil-over shocks, that gives you several ways to tune the front end. Just the idea I was looking for.

With this in mind, I cut off the torsion bars from the kit. I used a cross member with upper and lower control arms from a Testor's Boyd Hot Rod (there are 3 Testors Boyd kits, all have the same suspension, so anyone of them will do). I did have to cut the cross member to make it work. This cross member had the spindles molded in as well, one of the reasons I chose it. I also cut and used coil-over springs (from my parts box) between the control arms (to small to see, but they are there).

I used a rack and pinion off a Revell 2005 Mustang. The stock K member was retained, without the torsion bars, and I had to cut / modify the front sway bar. I made new connections for the outer tie rod ends on the rack.

The important thing here to remember is to get it all lined up. Try and get the spindles to be just where the stock ones would have been. Same distance apart (width) and same height. You want to make sure your wheels will fit (whichever you choose) and that the car sits right (hopefully level).

Here below I have primered it all to see how it looks and make it all one shade of color.

 

 

Model Revell kits cuda mopar

 

 

I painted the entire chassis with a coat of white primer. I then painted on the car /body color (Tamiya Orange). From this picture, you can see the final result of the front end with some detail painting done.

The exhaust system on this kit is molded into the chassis.

I don't always primer, but there were many various parts made of different color plastics used, so to give it all a uniform color, I needed a uniform base. Orange is a light color, so I used white primer.

(if you have read my articles before, you know I don't use an airbrush: just spray cans.).

 

 

Plymouth Cuda front end

 

Part 1 | Parts 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5

 

 

 


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